HIFR Welcomes New Truck

Yesterday we retired our old rescue truck, and at last night’s practice we welcomed its replacement. It’s a 2006 Ford F550 that we acquired courtesy of Oyster River Fire Rescue. Over the last half year, we have tweaked and changed, and painted, and just before this year’s busy season we were able to put it into service.

We’ve affectionately named it “64” after its predecessor, although it’s often referred to by its less official nickname, “New 64”.

The entire department pushes the new rig into its bay

The “wetting down” ceremony is a long-standing tradition dating back to the days of horse-drawn fire trucks. In those days, the firefighters would unhook the truck from the horses, wash it, then push it into the garage by hand. It became a tradition that fire departments follow whenever a new apparatus arrives.

We asked our newest recruit, Ticara, and our most senior firefighter, Rob, to do the wetting.

Thanks to our friends at the Campbell River Fire Dispatch Center for providing the inaugural page to welcome the new truck. Thank you also to Rachelle for the photos.

Old 64 Retires

A good friend retired. Our old and faithful 1981 International rescue truck came out of service yesterday after steadfastly serving our community for 36 years.

Back when old 64 was called 61.

When it first arrived on Hornby it was named “61” and was the first-out engine. It had a front mounted pump on a large platform as you can see in the photo to the right. In 2006 a new pumper truck arrived and became 61. The old International had its water tank and pump removed, was refitted with cabinets to become a general purpose rescue truck, and was renamed “64”. It transported our high angle rescue gear, our auto extrication tools, the trail rescue equipment, and our wildfire gear.

It always starts, runs like a champ, and has been a great truck. We even used it to transport a patient when the starter died on our patient transport vehicle. Sure, it spews carbon monoxide and leaks a bit of oil, but who among us doesn’t have similar problems.

Goodbye, friend. Long live the new 64.

New rules for High Risk Activites

All across the Comox Valley Regional District, fire departments have been using different guidelines when considering high-risk activities during times of extreme fire hazard. We have all now settled on one consistent set of rules.

Staff at the CVRD set up a web page that explains these guidelines and activities.

To be clear, at this time there is no ban on high risk activities. We will provide notice when or if that time comes.

Campfire Ban in effect Wed July 18 at noon

It’s been a pretty good run for campfires this year but this heat has dried up any moisture in the ground and the BC Ministry of Forests has declared a campfire ban. The ban comes into effect on Wed, July 18 at noon.

CSA approved propane appliances are still allowed as are briquette barbecues. Thanks in advance for your cooperation.

HIFR Hosts the Blues

I got a call a few days ago from a Hornby Island Blues Society volunteer saying that they needed a replacement venue for a bass workshop. I asked if a truck bay would work and in less than ten minutes he dropped by to check it out for himself. I spent a couple of hours clearing the plan and was thrilled to call HIBS back to say it would work.

Hornby Island Blues Camp’s newest classroom

Ten students showed up this morning to learn bass guitar techniques from their  instructor, Gary Kendall, one of the finest blues bassists in the country.

I’m exited to share our beautiful new firehall with them for the next couple of days and so pleased that HIFR is able to help out with this fantastic festival.